'SPIKE' The Animal's Champion Inc - AN INTERNATIONAL NON PROFIT PUBLIC CHARITY
WE ARE NOT YOUR AVERAGE FAUNA SITE.   OUR MISSION STATEMENT IS  ON THE 'ABOUT US' PAGE.  .......
 
SPIKE SPONSORS VARIOUS HUMANITARIAN ORGANIZATIONS.
WE ARE PREPARING THAT PAGE FOR YOU SOON.
 
THEY ARE:
1.  FEMA - AMERICA'S  EMERGENCY PROGRMS.
2. THE REMAINDER OF THIS LIST WILL APPEAR BY AUG. 10-2014 FOR YOUR REVIEW.
 
 
THIS FIRST PHOTOGRAPH IS ONE OF OUR NETWORKING PARTNERS.  THIS MAN IS FROM DENMARK SHOWING HOW THINGS SHOULD BE.  NEXT WE WILL DIRECT YOU TO THE POSTER PAGE OF HOW TOO MANY THINGS ARE.
 
© 2014 National Geographic  tiger caught in trap with paw
Battling India's Illegal Tiger Trade
Feb. 12, 2014—The overwhelming demand for tiger parts on the Asian market means India's tigers face constant peril from poachers. Conservationist Belinda Wright and her team at the Wildlife Protection Society of India are working to save tigers







 
 
 

 
 
THIS DONATE BUTTOM IS FOR OUR ORGANIZATION - SPIKE.
..........................................................................................................................
 
 
PETALUMA, Calif. 2-11-14 (AP) — A California slaughterhouse at the center of a massive beef recall has voluntarily halted operations, as it tries to track down all of its beef shipments over the past year, a newspaper reported.Petaluma-based Rancho Feeding Corp. was compiling a list of companies affected by the recall, its owner, Robert Singleton, told the Santa Rosa Press Democrat (http://bit.ly/1jszBqa) on Monday.The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced on Saturday that the company was recalling more than 8.7 million pounds of beef products that it processed from Jan. 1, 2013 through Jan. 7, 2014 and shipped to distribution centers and retail stores in California, Florida, Illinois and Texas.The USDA said the facility processed diseased and unhealthy animals without a full federal inspection. The agency said without a full inspection, the recalled products were unfit for human consumption. They include beef carcasses, oxtail, liver, cheeks, tripe, tongue and veal bones.The company had previously recalled more than 40,000 pounds of meat products produced on Jan. 8 that also didn't undergo a full inspection.Singleton told the Press Democrat the company undertook the recall out of an abundance of caution and regrets any inconvenience to customers. He declined further comment, the newspaper reported.___Information from: The Santa Rosa Press Democrat, http://www.pressdemocrat.com
MARCH 27-14
Apparently, a maintenance worker at Rotterdam’s Diergaarde Blijdorp zoo is dying from cancer. He requested that he be brought to the zoo to pay a last visit to some kind giraffes.“Heart-breaking pictures have emerged of the moment a giraffe said goodbye to a terminally ill zoo worker, who had spent most of his adult life cleaning the animal’s enclosures,” Independent.ie writes. Apparently, the giraffes came over to nuzzle and kiss Mario rather quickly. Here’s a bit more:
“These animals recognised him, and felt that (things aren’t) going well with him,’ Kees Veldboer, the founder of the AWF told Dutch newspaper Algemeen Dagblad.
“(It was) a very special moment. You saw him beaming.”
Mario, who has a mental disability, was also given the chance to say goodbye to his colleagues at the zoo, where he has worked for almost 25 years.

Read more at http://planetsave.com/2014/03/22/giraffe-kisses-maintenance-worker-dying-cancer/#EMjcvYbHzzWhWeE3.99
 
 YAHOO.NEWS  JAN. 21-14  
One-Quarter of Sharks and Rays at Risk of Extinction
                                            Landowners May Soon Shoot, Trap More Wolves
                                                    NOW MONTANA  - WHAT IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE THAT THEY JUST WANT TO KEEP KILLING. KILLING AND KILLING?  MONTANA GOV. IS BEING CONTACTED......JAN 20-14         
      .........................................................................................................................
      THE INHUMANE KILLING OF DOLPHINS IN JAPAN.  SHE IS USA'S
      AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN. GO TO PAGE"TORTURE AND KILLING
      OF ANIMALS-2"  FOR STORY.
      Horse slaughter blocked by federal law  JAN.18-14
      .
      ...........................................................................
      By Laura Zuckerman SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) - A district judge on Friday denied a request from conservationists to block Idaho's efforts to trap and kill two wolf packs targeted for eradication in a federally protected wilderness area for preying on elk prized by hunters.The state Department of Fish and Game last month hired a trapper to eliminate the pair of wolf packs from the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness in central Idaho, where wolves were imported from Canada in the mid-1990s in a bid to reintroduce the species to the Northern Rockies.The trapping program has become the latest flashpoint in a long-running controversy over wolf management in the region. State officials have not specified how many wolves are believed to make up the packs in question but said nine animals have been killed so far.Gray wolves were placed under safeguards of the federal Endangered Species Act in 1974, after being hunted, trapped and poisoned to near extinction decades earlier throughout the continental United States.But wolves in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming lost their protected status in recent years as their numbers rebounded and states pushed to renew hunting and trapping rights, arguing that the predators had become too big a threat to livestock and to big-game animals such as elk.Environmental groups have claimed, however, that Idaho went too far by going after wolves in a federally designated wilderness, which by definition has been aside by the government to preserve its natural character.Defenders of Wildlife and other groups filed a lawsuit earlier this month in District Court in Boise alleging that an "extermination program" in the wilderness near Salmon violated federal preservation rules and required special environmental and public reviews. They asked a judge to halt the eradication of the two packs until the overall case was adjudicated.District Judge Edward Lodge sided with Idaho and the Forest Service in finding that no reviews were necessary since federal land managers had yet to determine if eliminating wolf packs in the 2.4 million-acre Frank Church conflicts with preservation requirements spelled out in the federal Wilderness Act."No final agency action has been taken in regards to the Wilderness Act," Lodge wrote in Friday's ruling.Idaho Fish and Game and Forest Service officials did not immediately respond on Friday to requests for comment.Conservationists said they would immediately appeal Lodge's decision."We don't believe that killing wolves to artificially increase elk herds for hunters is a legitimate way to manage a wilderness, which is not an elk game farm," said Jonathan Proctor of Defenders of Wildlife.(Reporting by Laura Zuckerman; Editing by Steve Gorman and Richard Chang)
      JAN.18-14   SEE STORY ON 'ERADICATION OF ANIMALS' PAGE
      Refuses to halt wolf trapping in Idaho wilderness
            \............................................................................................................................

            News Find Out Why Endangered Tortoises Are Being DefacedABC
              . View galleryFind Out Why Endangered Tortoises Are Being Defaced (ABC 
                Some of the rarest tortoises in the world are a hot commodity on the black market for their unique golden shells which can sell for tens of thousands of dollars.In an effort to obstruct poachers, conservationists have made the bold move to carve into the shells of the tortoises, protecting the animals by making their domes less attractive. The branded shells also make it easier for authorities to trace them if they are stolen."Endangered tortoises and turtles are facing a real threat, and we're hoping that this will be an effective tool to keep them safe," Eric Goode, the founder and president of the Turtle Conservancy told ABC News today.Years of hunting have caused near extinction for many tortoise species, so sanctuaries and zoos are using identification marks, including laser inscribing, tattoos and engraving to hinder poachers and discourage collectors from paying a great deal of money for the animals.Since the conservancy began putting the branded tortoises back into the wild in 2011, the shells have not come up in the black market, which officials believe is a good sign.The Turtle Conservancy's Behler Chelonian Center in Ventura County, Calif., has been working with ploughshare tortoises among others which originate from Madagascar. Their goal is to engrave the shells of both the ploughshares in captivity as well as those living in the wild."Because there are so few of them left, no one really knows how many are in the wild," said Goode. "We estimate that there are between 100 to 300 [tortoises] and that they only occupy about 10 square miles."Some of the endangered tortoises can sell on the black market for upwards of $40,000, so they are considered a gold mine for those who find them."Engraving their shells is not dissimilar to cutting off a rhino horn to make them less attractive to poachers," said Goode.The process of engraving on turtle and tortoise shells can sometimes hurt the animal so the researchers at the Turtle Conservancy work hard to engrave as superficially as possible. Goode described the process like pressing on a fingernail."It probably doesn't feel comfortable for [the tortoises], but we don't drill deeper than the keratin layer of the shell," said Goode. "As long as we don't hit the bone of the shell beneath the keratin layer, the tortoise is okay. I believe the period of discomfort is worth it to save the animal's life."Turtles and tortoises predate dinosaurs, having lived on planet Earth for over 250 million years. However, they are slow, passive animals and not the best at evading hunters and poachers."These reptiles are survivors, but they are helpless to some extent. It's our job to work to protect them and we are doing everything we can to keep them safe from poachers," said Goode

                By Jonathan Kaminsky (Reuters) - A temporary ban on horsemeat processing has been added to a 2014 omnibus spending bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday, a Democratic senator said, as a New Mexico judge weighs blocking a return of horse slaughter plants in the state.The measure would bar the United States Department of Agriculture from using federal funds to inspect horsemeat, effectively outlawing an industry that has fought to regain a foothold since the last U.S. horse slaughterhouses were shuttered in 2007.The federal spending bill will move to the U.S. Senate, which is expected to pass it this week and send it to the White House for President Barack Obama's signature."Slaughtering horses is inhumane, disgusting and unnecessary, and there is no place for it in the United States," Senator Mary Landrieu of Louisiana, a proponent of the measure, said in a written statement.The legislation comes as a New Mexico slaughterhouse seeks to become the first to operate in the United States since 2007, a move the state's attorney general, Gary King, has sued to block.With a midnight Wednesday deadline looming for new spending authority, lawmakers will still need a three-day stop-gap funding extension to ensure enough time for passage of the spending bill this week.In New Mexico, the case against Valley Meat Co was brought by the state's attorney general, Gary King, who asserted that horsemeat is unfit for human consumption and in violation of state food safety laws because of the scores of drugs the animals are administered while alive.Horse meat is not consumed by Americans, but is eaten in parts of Europe and Asia, and is fed to some U.S. zoo animals.A ruling in the New Mexico case is expected on Friday, though it would be rendered moot by a USDA inspection ban, and the lawsuit may be withdrawn if Congress acts before the judge rules, said Phil Sisneros, spokesman for King.CONTENTIOUS ISSUEAn attorney for Valley Meat, which plans to convert its cattle slaughterhouse into one that processes horsemeat, did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment.If passed by Congress, the measure banning USDA inspections of horsemeat would apply through the end of September - but could be extended in the event of so-called continuing resolutions that keep the government's spending on autopilot until a new spending package is authorized."It could last for nine months, or it could last for two years," said Wayne Pacelle, president of the Human Society of the United States, which supports the ban.Congress passed a horsemeat inspection ban in 2006, with the three horse slaughter plants on U.S. soil - two in Texas and one in Illinois - shutting down the following year in the wake of additional state judicial and legislative action. But U.S. lawmakers did not renew the ban in 2011, creating an opening for the contentious industry to reemerge.Proponents of horse slaughter have pointed to a growing population of unwanted horses in the United States as a reason to bring the industry back.Opponents counter that there are more humane ways of dealing with an excess horse population, including expansion of horse sanctuaries and, in some cases, euthanasia.The Humane Society last year filed a lawsuit seeking to block Valley Meat and others from opening horse slaughterhouses in several states. That case, which is pending in a federal appellate court in Colorado, would also be rendered moot by congressional action, Pacelle said.Landrieu is among the lawmakers pushing a more comprehensive measure, known as the SAFE act, that would create a permanent ban both on horsemeat processing in the United States and on the export of American horses to be slaughtered abroad.(Editing by Dan Whitcomb and Richard Chang

                 
                Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint